Collection

Collection

The collection at the TextielMuseum is subdivided into four part collections:

Textile techniques
Industrial culture
Textile design
Art collection
 

Textile techniques

The 'textile techniques' collection at the TextielMuseum consists of raw materials, tools, semi-finished products, pieces of equipment and machines.

Stoommachine A & N Mutsaerts in het TextielMuseumSteam engine A & N Mutsaerts at the TextielMuseum

These are used or were used for the processing of a raw material such as wool or cotton into finished textile products such as a tablecloth or tea towel. The objects were made in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. The industrialization of the Netherlands becomes clear: the cottage industry weavers with hand-weaving looms, the large factories with hundreds of steam-driven textile machines, and present-day specialized companies with computer-controlled equipment.
 

Industrial culture

In the 'industrial culture' collection objects have been collected of the Dutch textile industry from around 1860 till the present day.

Impressive banners of the textile unions, portraits of manufacturers, strike leaflets, a beautiful wood sculpture of Saint Severus, the patron saint of weavers, and a time clock from a textile factory are all examples of items in the collection.

Banner Textiel Vereeniging St. Lidwina Goorle.

 

Textile design

Tea towels, tablecloths, floor coverings, upholstery fabrics and curtains all belong to the TextielMuseum 'textile design' collection. The collection includes work of the Dutch designers and artists from 1880 to the present day.

Examples of household textiles are the well-known AaBe blankets and the Ploeg fabrics from the 50’s of the 20th century. Beautiful damask items, such as those represented by Chris Lebeau, but also Art Nouveau batik fabrics and Amsterdam School carpets. In addition, there are modern interior design fabrics, for example those from Ulf Moritz.

Ploegfabric 'Plano', design Elmar Berkovich

Modern implements are also gathered together in the collection, such as the knotted chair from Marcel Wanders, the ragbag chair from Tejo Remy and the Ballroom lamp from Gijs Bakker. During the last few years many products made in the TextielLab have been included in the museum collection.

The museum invited artists and designers to make experimental fabrics, installations, wall coverings and sitting objects. An interesting textile collection came to life, such as digitally printed fabrics from Eugène van Veldhoven, transparent felt fabrics from Claudy Jongstra, furniture from Kiki van Eijk and Pieke Bergmans, and modern day table-linen from designers such as Peter Struycken, Studio Job, Frank Van den Broeck, Marc Mulders and Hella Jongerius, Studio Job, Ineke Hans, Scholten & Baijings and Marc Mulders.

In 2008 the museum started to collect fashion design. It concers present day fashion which is made in the TextielLab. For example, the museum acquired two interesting pieces by Jan Taminiau from the Couture Collection ‘Follies – Autumn/Winter 2007-2008’. Objects from the beginning of the process, like first drafts, designs, colour and yarn samples are also collected.
 

Art collection 1960 to the present day

The TextielMuseum’s visual 'arts collection' contains artworks by Dutch artists in which textiles or flexible materials are used. The collection covers the period from 1960 to the present day.

From the 60’s and 70’s there are many wall coverings and textile objects from the so-called ‘pioneers’ of the textile movement. Bright colours, austere forms and new uses of materials all characterise the work of, for example, Herman and Desirée Scholten, Madeleine Bosscher, Loes van der Horst, and Ria van Eyk. The textile wall coverings and objects from artists such as C.A. Wertheim, Wilma Kuil, Marian Bijlenga and Barbara Broekman are concerned more with the expression of an idea. Exceptional objects are the ‘soft sculptures’ that people can stroke, such as those from Harry Boom, Tom Claassen and Karin Arink, and the inflatable objects from Nico Parlevliet.

The museum also collects modern ‘textile’ ornaments and objects to wear, such as those from Lam de Wolf, Iris Eichenberg and Felieke van de Leest.